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Boulder Family Law Blog

Same-sex couples must stay on top of changing laws

In last week's blog post, we discussed how the legality of same-sex marriage in Colorado is undergoing a lot of firsts. All of these firsts mean that the laws are constantly changing. Staying on top of all the changes, rulings and precedents being set can be a challenging undertaking. We understand that you might not have all the time in the world to keep up with everything going on when it comes to same-sex marriage and divorce.

If you are in a same-sex relationship that is falling apart, you might wonder exactly how all the changes going on might affect you. We can help you figure out how the changes will affect you if you end up going through a divorce. From creating parenting plans and working through child custody matters to figuring out how to divide assets and debts, we can help you learn about the laws so that you can make informed decisions.

Same-sex partners face changing laws in Colorado

With all the news about same-sex marriages, some of our Colorado readers might be wondering how the latest developments will affect people in the state. The answer is simple, but it is also complicated. With the order of the Attorney General John Suthers, all 64 county clerks in the state have to issue same-sex marriage licenses. This means that courts will also have to deal with same-sex divorce cases. There are some other aspects to same-sex couples that are also affected by the acceptance of same-sex marriage.

Since 2013, Colorado has issued civil unions to same-sex couples. That is one thing that isn't changing because of the acceptance of same-sex marriages. Couples who want civil unions can still get those, and couples who are already in civil unions can remain in those.

Virtual visitation might solve some child custody issues

For parents who don't have primary or physical custody of their children, spending time with the children might be difficult. The problem is sometimes made even more difficult if the child's custodial parent doesn't live near the non-custodial parent. In the past, the non-custodial parent might have had to deal with only getting periodic phone calls from their child. With the changes in technology that are occurring on a rapid basis, it is now easier for non-custodial parents to be an active part of their child's life. Our readers in Colorado might like to know how virtual visitation works and how it can help the parent and child.

Virtual visitation is a method that parents can use to spend time with a child when actually being with the child in a physical manner isn't possible. This can involve sending emails or having video chats with the child. Other forms of digital communication are also possible, such as texting or chatting via social media.

Parenting agreements can make child custody matters easier

In our blog last week, we mentioned that Kris and Bruce Jenner are getting a divorce and that they are seeking joint custody of their youngest daughter. The divorce seems to be affecting the teenage girl, but at least she isn't having to deal with a bitter child custody battle over her. For our readers in Colorado who are parents going through a divorce, learning about parenting agreements might help them to come to an agreement about how to handle their own child custody matters.

In order to come up with a parenting agreement, parents must be willing to compromise. This agreement is usually the result of some give and take from the parents. In some cases, the parents' attorneys might be the ones to hash out the agreement on behalf of their clients.

Bruce and Kris Jenner divorce, daughter affected

When some people divorce, they are able to do so in a way that is amicable. When that happens, it is sometimes possible for the former spouses to keep up a good working relationship and a friendship that can have a positive impact on the children. The amicability of the divorce also has an effect on those most affected by the divorce -- their children. In the case of Kris and Bruce Jenner, their divorce is amicable, but it is still affecting their youngest child.

The Jenners have been separated for 11 months. Last April, they celebrated their 23rd wedding anniversary. When the couple recently filed for divorce, they cited irreconcilable differences as the reason for the divorce. At 17, their youngest child is almost old enough to go out on her own. The divorce, however, seems to be causing some strife in her life when her Instagram posts are taken into account.

Custody and support modification can be complex in Colorado

In last week's post, we discussed some of the criteria for getting child support orders modified. For people who are going through a situation that meets those criteria, seeking modification of child support orders can be a time-consuming process. In some cases, the need to modify child support orders in Colorado has to do with a change in child custody.

No matter what the reason for child support modification, we understand that you deserve to have your interests protected. We also know that your child's interests have to be protected as well, since that is the top priority in all cases involving children.

What are child support modifications in Colorado?

When you are one of the parties involved in a child custody case, you have probably heard about child support modifications. Child support modifications are changes to the child support order, which can only be done through the court system.

Colorado residents who pay or receive child support might have some questions about the modifications that they would like answered. These answers are basic answers, so it is vital that you determine how applicable laws might affect your case.

Changing divorce laws can take time to learn

Few things in life are harder than seeing the marriage you worked hard to build go down the drain. When that happens and divorce is in the plans, it is important for you to make sure that your interests are protected as you move through the process. Some people might not realize just how involved the divorce process can be in Colorado.

We understand that you have a lot going through your mind during the divorce. We know that it is emotionally trying to have to deal with all the choices that have to be made. Knowing the current Colorado laws and understanding how to apply those to your case can take up considerable time and energy. This is especially true for those who are in same-sex relationships because of the constant changes in the current laws that are coming forth as cases make their way through the legal system.

Key steps to getting a divorce in Colorado

Are you thinking about getting a divorce in Colorado? If so, it is very important to make sure that you take all of the right legal steps to do so. Here are some of the most important ones to keep in mind.

The first step is just a decision that you and your spouse have to make. If you agree about the divorce, you can file for it jointly. If not, you may need to file on your own and inform your spouse that you have done so.

What is a domestic partnership in Boulder?

There are some cases in which a couple might want to document their relationship without having to take the huge step of getting married. A domestic partnership might be the best choice to do this. Boulder offers a registry for domestic partnerships that allows you to document your relationship. Knowing about the registry might help you to decide if it is a good option for you.

Why should I register my domestic partnership?

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